The Center for Wound Healing at Oswego Health Promotes Foot Health Education During April’s National Foot Health Awareness Month

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                 Contact: Jamie Leszczynski
                                                                                                                                                (315) 349-5601
                                                                                                                                                jleszczynski@oswegohealth.org      

 

The Center for Wound Healing at Oswego Health Promotes Foot Health Education
During April’s National Foot Health Awareness Month
 

(Oswego, NY – April 13, 2021) April is National Foot Health Awareness Month and the experts at The Center for Wound Healing at Oswego Health are spreading awareness of common foot wounds and treatments with a patient-focused education campaign.

Right now, nearly 7 million Americans are living with a chronic wound, and more than two million of those are suffering from diabetic foot ulcers. Sadly, if left untreated, non-healing wounds can lead to infection, amputation, and even loss of life.

    - Approximately 80% of lower limb amputations are preceded by a non-healing foot ulceration.

Some of the primary risk factors for wounds of the feet include neuropathy, deformity of the foot, history of foot ulceration, absent or diminished pulses, and prior amputation.

The most common types of foot wounds are diabetic foot ulcers, venous stasis ulcers, arterial or ischemic ulcers, and pressure ulcers.

There are preventative measures everyone can do to improve foot health. The Center for Wound Healing at Oswego Health offers the following foot care tips:

•    Check your feet for red spots, cuts, swelling, blisters, sores, or other injuries daily.

•    Wash your feet every day and dry them with care, especially between the toes.

•    Wear properly fitting shoes that do not rub or pinch your feet.

•    Always wear socks or stockings with your shoes, and never walk barefoot or while wearing just socks.

•    Physical activity can help increase circulation in your feet. Consult your healthcare team to see which physical activity is right for you.

Regular foot inspections are key to prevention. All patients, but especially people living with diabetes, should take off their socks at every check-up to check for any problems with their feet. Proper footwear, a healthy diet, and maintaining healthy glucose levels can also help prevent wounds. 

The Center for Wound Healing at Oswego Health offers comprehensive wound care and leading-edge treatments including hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin substitutes, biological and biosynthetic dressings, and growth factor therapies.

For more information, contact The Center for Wound Healing at Oswego Health at 110 West Sixth Street; Oswego, New York, 13126 or by calling 315-326-3780.

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About Healogics

Headquartered in Jacksonville, Fla., Healogics is the nation’s wound healing expert. Last year over 300,000 patients received advanced wound care through a nationwide network of over 600 Wound Care Centers. The Healogics team is made up of almost 3,000 employees, 4,000 affiliated physicians, and a Healogics Specialty Physician practice group of nearly 300. In addition to the company’s network of outpatient Centers, Healogics partners with over 300 skilled nursing facilities to care for patients with chronic wounds and provides inpatient consults at more than 60 partner hospitals. As the industry leader, Healogics has the largest repository of chronic wound-specific patient data in the country. The Healogics Wound Science Initiative, an effort launched in 2017 to provide peer-reviewed research, recognizes the value and relevance of big data and advanced analytics to drive continuous, collaborative learning towards a better understanding of how to efficiently utilize healthcare resources for patients with wounds. For additional information, please visit Healogics.com.

 

About Oswego Health:
The mission of Oswego Health is to provide accessible, quality care and improve the health of residents throughout Oswego County. As a nonprofit healthcare system that was established in 1881, Oswego Health is proud to continue to be one of Oswego County’s largest employers. More than 1,200 employees work for the Oswego Health system, which includes the 164-bed community Oswego Hospital, a 32-bed psychiatric acute-care facility with multiple outpatient behavioral health service locations, The Manor at Seneca Hill, a 120-bed skilled nursing facility, and Springside at Seneca Hill, a retirement community. Oswego Health also has Health Services Centers located throughout Oswego County.For more information about Oswego Health, please visit our website  www.oswegohealth.org.

 

Post Date

Apr 13th 2021